back to search results place the mouse over an image to zoom

Maximus of Tyre.

Maximus of Tyre. ΜΑΞΙΜΟΥ ΤΥΡΙΟΥ ΛΟΓΟΙ. Maximi Tyrii Dissertationes, ex recensione Ioannis Davisii. Editio altera, ad duos Codices. Mss. locis quamplurimis emendata, Notisqve locupletoiris aucta. Cui accesserunt Viri erudiissimi, Ier. Marklandi, Coll. D.Petri Cantabrig. Socii Annotationes.

Londini- London. Excudit Gulielmus Bowyer, Sumptibus Societatis ad Literas Promovendas institutæ 1740
4to. pp. 17, [v], 727, [ix]. Greek and Latin text.
Speckled calf, 5 raised bands; gilt.
The second edition of John Davies' critical edition of the works of Maximus of Tyre, second century Platonist, (originally published 1703), with revisions by Jeremiah Markland.
Maximus of Tyre, reputed to have been the tutor of Marcus Aurelius, writes dissertations on theological, ethical and philosophical subjects include quotations from Plato and Homer.
The philosophical content derives from Platonism and Cynicism. Head cap and tail of spine chipped; joints starting; internally crisp and bright.

MAXIMUS OF TYRE (Cassius Maximus Tyrius),
a Greek rhetorician and philosopher who flourished in the time of the Antonines and Commodus (2nd century A.D.). After the manner of the sophists of his age, he travelled extensively, delivering lectures on the way. His writings contain many allusions to the history of Greece, while there is little reference to Rome; hence it is inferred that he lived longer in Greece, perhaps as a professor at Athens. Although nominally a Platonist, he is really an Eclectic and one of the precursors of Neoplatonism. There are still extant by him forty-one essays or discourses (διαλέξεις) on theological, ethical, and other philosophical commonplaces. With him God is the supreme being, one and indivisible though called by many names, accessible to reason alone; but as animals form the intermediate stage between plants and human beings, so there exist intermediaries between God and man, viz. daemons, who dwell on the confines of heaven and earth. The soul in many ways bears a great resemblance to the divinity; it is partly mortal, partly immortal, and, when freed from the fetters of the body, becomes a daemon. Life is the sleep of the soul, from which it awakes at death. The style of Maximus is superior to that of the ordinary sophistical rhetorician, but scholars differ widely as to the merits of the essays themselves. [1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, Volume 17]

John Davies (1679–1732) was an English cleric and academic, known as a classical scholar, and President of Queens' College, Cambridge from 1717.

William Bowyer (16991777), was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, in 1722 became a partner in his father's business. In 1729 he was appointed printer of the votes of the House of Commons, and in 1736 printer to the Society of Antiquaries, of which he was elected a fellow in 1737. In 1737 he took as apprentice John Nichols, who was to be his successor and biographer. In 1761 Bowyer became printer to the Royal Society, and in 1767 printer of the rolls of the House of Lords and the journals of the House of Commons. He died on the 13th of November 1777, leaving unfinished a number of large works and among them the reprint of Domesday Book. He wrote a great many tracts and pamphlets, edited, arranged and published a host of books, but perhaps his principal work was an edition of the New Testament in Greek, with notes.
Brunet:3,1552; Graesse:4,453. 265 by 215mm (10½ by 8½ inches).   ref: 2994  €850

Company: Bryan, Mary Louise. Address: 6 Alikarnassou Street, 21100 Nafplion, Greece.
Vat No: EL 119092581