64 results (displaying results 31 - 40) First « 1 2 3 4 5 6 » Last

The Plain of Olympia, Elis, Peloponnesus.

Plain of Olympia. Dodwell, Edward. Plain of Olympia. " Plain of Olympia." London Rodwell & Martin. 1821
Aquatint view of the plain of Olympia from the Deluxe edition of Dodwell's "Views in Greece". Original hand colour, mounted on card with title caption to verso.
The view shows the course of the Alpheios river winding across the plain. Dodwell states that there is very little to be seen of the former marvels of antiquity that adorned the plain, except for the bases of a couple of columns; he goes on to encourage archeologists to follow the plan of Winkleman for excavation of the area. Bright and clean.
Atabey:357;Blackmer/Navari: 493; Abbey, Travel: 130; Colas 876; Weber I: 1110. 248 by 395mm (9¾ by 15½ inches).    €750
Stock No. 2595 - Greece full description

Mega Spileo, Arkadia

The Monastery of Megaspellia. Dodwell, Edward. The Monastery of Megaspellia. "The Monastery of Megaspillia in Arcadia" London Rodwell & Martin. 1821
Aquatint view of the monastery of Mega Spileo from Dodwell's "Views in Greece". Original hand colour.
The view shows the monastery against the tall cliff, which made it impregnable to attackers.
The monastery, possibly the oldest in Greece, is built against a rocky cliff in Arkadia not far from Kalabryta. It takes its name from the large cave over which it is built. Light foxing to sky; short tear to lower blank margin, not close to image.
Blackmer/Navari: 493; Atabey:357; Abbey, Travel: 130; Colas 876; Weber I: 1110. 255 by 500mm (10 by 19¾ inches).    €1000
Stock No. 2594 - Greece full description

Peloponnesus.

Peloponnesus today the Kingdom of Morea... Homann, Johann Baptist Peloponnesus today the Kingdom of Morea... "Peloponesus hodie Moreæ Regnum.." Nuremberg Homann, Johann Baptist c1716
Copper engraved map of the Peloponnesus by Johann Bapt. Homann. Original colour, verso blank.
The map shows the whole of the Peloponnesus with the Ionian islands of Levkada, Kephalonia, Ithaka and Zakinthos to the right ; Kithera/ Cerigo to the south with the Corinthian and Saronic Gulfs.
Large decorative title cartouche and vignette surmounted by the Lion of Venice with St Marks in the background, vanquished Turks falling to the ground Good impression; printed slightly crooked on page therefor left margin a bit short at lower left [approx 5mm from plate mark].very light toning; cartouche black & white as issued slightly faded at top[ view of St Marks, Venice;split at lower centre fold [35mm] repaired with archival tape to verso.
Zacharakis: 1650/1082. 495 by 589mm (19½ by 23¼ inches).    €650
Stock No. 2509 - Greece full description

Castle Tornese/Chlemoutsi, Ellis, N.W Peloponnesus.

Castle Tornese. Loschge, Leonhard. Castle Tornese. "Castro Tornese" Nürnberg/ Nuremberg. Loschge Leonhard. 1687
Extremely scarce small copper engraved view of Castro Tornese/Chlemoutsi in Ellis, North West Peloponnesus from Loschge's "Neue vermehrte Beschreibungder trflichen Halbinsel Morea mit den Angrezenten Inseln und Provinzen des Coronelli und andern Italianischen Schriften"
Modern hand colour
Catle Tornese / Chiemoutsi is a medieval castle built in the early 1220s by the Crusader rulers of the Principality of Achaea as their main stronghold. Located near the Principality's capital of Andravida and the chief port of Glarentza, Chlemoutsi played a central role in the Principality's history, but was never actually besieged. After coming under Byzantine rule in 1427, it was captured in 1460 by the Ottoman Empire, along with the rest of the Byzantine Despotate of the Morea. With the Ottoman conquest, the castle lost much of its strategic significance, although it was occupied by the Venetians during the Ottoman–Venetian War of 1463–79, and attacked by the Knights of Malta in 1620. From the 15th century, Italian sources came to call it Castel Tornese, apparently through a confusion with the seat of the Principality's mint in nearby Glarentza, which until the middle of the 14th century minted silver tornese coins In Ottoman times, minor additions were made to provide platforms for artillery, but the castle progressively lost its significance and was completely deserted by the late 18th century. In 1825, during the Greek War of Independence, part of its outer wall was demolished to prevent the Greek rebels from using it. Dark impression; modern hand colour; mounted.
Not In Zacharakis but description of maps Nos 2080-2101. 65 by 114mm (2½ by 4½ inches).    €120
Stock No. 2720 - Greece full description

Andravida, Ellis, N.W Peloponnesus.

Andravida. Loschge, Leonhard. Andravida. "Antrivida." Nürnberg/ Nuremberg. Loschge Leonhard. 1687
Extremely scarce small copper engraved view of Andravida in Ellis, North West Peloponnesus from Loschge's "Neue vermehrte Beschreibungder trflichen Halbinsel Morea mit den Angrezenten Inseln und Provinzen des Coronelli und andern Italianischen Schriften"
Modern hand colour.
Andravida's early history is obscure: the name is of unknown provenance—several proposals have been made, the most probable of which is that it derives from a Slavic name for "place of the otters"—and the site is not mentioned before the conquest by the Crusaders in 1205, even though it certainly existed before that. According to the Chronicle of the Morea, Andravida, like most of the towns and regions of the northern and western Peloponnese, was captured without a fight in 1205 by the Crusader leader William of Champlitte, and it was there that the local Greek magnates and lords of Elis and of the mountains of Skorta and Mesarea paid him homage and recognized him as their lord.
Soon after the Frankish conquest, Andravida (known as Andreville in French, Andrevilla in Aragonese and Andravilla in Italian) became the residence of the princes of the newly established Principality of Achaea. As the medievalist Antoine Bon points out, Andravida's choice as the de facto capital of the principality rested on its favourable location: situated in the midst of the fertile plain of Elis, it was well provisioned and could sustain horses, it was located near the major port town of Glarentza, but not on the coast and hence not vulnerable to seaborne raids, and was equally far from the mountains of the central Peloponnese with their rebellious inhabitants. Consequently, despite its importance, it was never fortified. The town also became the seat of a Roman Catholic bishopric, attested since 1212, which assimilated the pre-existing Greek bishopric of Olena and retained the latter's name. Dark impression; modern hand colour; mounted.
Not In Zacharakis but description of maps Nos 2080-2101. 65 by 115mm (2½ by 4½ inches).    €160
Stock No. 2721 - Greece full description

Sikyon, Peloponnesus.

Sikyon. Loschge, Leonhard. Sikyon. "Sitionia" Nürnberg/ Nuremberg. Loschge Leonhard. 1687
Extremely scarce small copper engraved view of Sikyon, Peloponnesus from Loschge's "Neue vermehrte Beschreibungder trflichen Halbinsel Morea mit den Angrezenten Inseln und Provinzen des Coronelli und andern Italianischen Schriften"
Modern hand colour. Dark impression; modern hand colour; mounted.
Not In Zacharakis but description of maps Nos 2080-2101. 65 by 114mm (2½ by 4½ inches).    €160
Stock No. 2730 - Greece full description

Koroni, Messinia, SW Peloponnesus,

Plan of the City and fortress of Koroni Captured in 1685. Loschge, Leonhard. Plan of the City and fortress of Koroni Captured in 1685. "Pianta della Citta e Fortezza di Coron cogl accampamenti del 1685" Nürnberg/ Nuremberg. Loschge Leonhard. 1687
Extremely scarce small copper engraved plan of the castle and town of Koroni, Messinia, Peloponnesus from Loschge's "Neue vermehrte Beschreibungder trflichen Halbinsel Morea mit den Angrezenten Inseln und Provinzen des Coronelli und andern Italianischen Schriften"
Modern hand colour
A castle with impressive fortifications at the southwestern end of Peloponnese which existed since the 7th century AD and was completed and reconstructed by the Venetians in the 13th century. The city flourished in the following centuries, but it was constantly in the middle of the long conflict between Venetians and Turks .As many castles in Peloponnese, the city became important and flourished after the 13th century and the Frankish occupation.
Following the fall of Constantinople to the Fourth Crusade in 1204, a Venetian fleet under Premarini and the son of Dandolo occupied it in 1206, and converted the port into a provisioning station "where all passing ships could receive a month's rations", a custom maintained, we are told, when the place became a regular Venetian colony.
Since 1205 Koroni belonged to the Frankish Principality of Achaea. In 1209, the ruler of Achaea Geoffroi de Villehardouin I had no choice than to cede officially the castle-city to the Venetians.
The Venetians made a major reconstruction and expansion of the castle which finished around the end of that century.
The fortress and town were captured by the Ottoman troops of Sultan Bayezid II, who led personally the operation, in 1500.
In 1532, the Habsburg emperor Charles V ordered the Genoese admiral Andrea Doria to attack Koroni as a diversion to the Turkish campaigns in Hungary. Doria managed to capture the city, and to lay waste to the surrounding coast.
In spring 1533, the Ottoman Emperor Suleiman the Magnificent sent 60 galleys to retake the city. They blockaded the harbour, but they were defeated by Doria, highlighting the weakness of the Ottoman Navy at that time. An Ottoman land army however was successful in laying a siege around the city, forcing its surrender on 1 April 1534. The weakened Spanish garrison was allowed to leave the city unharmed
In 1685 the Venetians under general Morozini returned and stayed until 1715. But the golden age of the city was not revived. Dark impression; modern hand colour; mounted.
Not In Zacharakis but description of maps Nos 2080-2101. 64 by 114mm (2½ by 4½ inches).    €80
Stock No. 2726 - Greece full description

Patras, W. Peloponnesus.

Patras. Loschge, Leonhard. Patras. "Patrasso" Nürnberg/ Nuremberg. Loschge Leonhard. 1687
Extremely scarce small copper engraved view of Patras, Peloponnesus from Loschge's "Neue vermehrte Beschreibungder trflichen Halbinsel Morea mit den Angrezenten Inseln und Provinzen des Coronelli und andern Italianischen Schriften"
Modern hand colour.
The view shows the city built at the foothills of Mount Panachaikon, overlooking the Gulf of Patras.In 1205 the city was captured by William of Champlitte and Villehardouin, and became a part of the principality of Achaea. It became the seat of the Barony of Patras, and its Latin archbishop primate of the principality. In 1387 Juan Fernández de Heredia, grand master of the order of the Knights Hospitaller at Rhodes, endeavoured to make himself master of Achaea and took Patras by storm. In 1408, Patras became Venetian, until it was recaptured in 1430 by the Despotate of Morea and its despot Constantine Palaiologos, who thus succeeded in recovering for the Byzantine Empire the whole of the Morea, apart from Venetian possessions. The administration of Patras was given to George Sphrantzes, while Constantine was immediately contested by the Ottoman Empire and later, in 1449, became emperor of the Byzantine empire.[8]

Patras remained a part of the Despotate of Morea until 1458, when it was conquered by the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, Mehmet II. Under the Ottomans, it was known as Baliabadra, from the Greek Παλαιά Πάτρα ("Old Patras"), as opposed to Νέα Πάτρα, the town of Ypati in Central Greece. Though Mehmet granted the city special privileges and tax reductions, it never became a major centre of commerce. Venice and Genoa attacked and captured it several times in the 15th and 16th centuries, but never re-established their rule effectively, except for a period of Venetian rule in 1687–1715. Dark impression; modern hand colour; mounted.
Not In Zacharakis but description of maps Nos 2080-2101. 65 by 114mm (2½ by 4½ inches).    €180
Stock No. 2731 - Greece full description

Passavas Castle, Laconia Mani. Peloponnesus.

Passavas. Loschge, Leonhard. Passavas. "Passava" Nürnberg/ Nuremberg. Loschge Leonhard. 1687
Extremely scarce small copper engraved view of the castle of Passavas, Laconia, Mani, Peloponnesus from Loschge's "Neue vermehrte Beschreibungder trflichen Halbinsel Morea mit den Angrezenten Inseln und Provinzen des Coronelli und andern Italianischen Schriften"
Modern hand colour

Passavas or Las ) is situated on the Mani Peninsula. In ancient times Las was a Spartan possession and in 218 BC the citizens of the city fought and routed and group of Philip V of Macedon's army. Las became part of the Union of Free Laconians in 195 BC when it separated from Sparta. The Spartans however recaptured the city in 189 BC. Sparta was then taken over by the Achaean League and Las gained its independence again. When the Romans took over most of Greece in 146 BC, Las and the other Free Laconian city continued to have independence. In Roman times, Las had a bath and a gymnasium.

The site is not mentioned in Byzantine times until the Frankish conquest of the Peloponnese, when Mani was given to the Baron Jean de Neuilly (or de Nully), who built a castle at Las. This castle became known as Passavant or Passavas, most probably after the family motto which was: Passe-Avant, "move forward"). Passavas was a small but important barony because it held the unruly Maniots at bay. When the prince of Achaea, Prince William II Villehardouin was defeated and captured at the Battle of Pelagonia, the Baron Jean de Neuilly was captured as well. Then, the Barony of Passavant passed to his daughter Margaret of Passavant, widow of the Lord of Lisarea Guibert de Cors (or d'Escors).[1][2] She was forced to give up her castle and her barony as part of Villehardouin's ransom.[3][4][5]

The castle was in use once again during the second Byzantine domination. The castle of Passavas was occupied by the Ottomans for a short time when they took over the majority of the Peloponnese, in a failed attempt to keep control over the Maniots who refused to accept Ottoman rule. In 1601, a Spanish fleet led by Alonso de Contreras that was raiding in the area surprised the Ottoman garrison and sacked the city. It was regarrisoned in 1669, by the Ottoman general Kuesy Ali Pasha. The castle was captured again in 1684 by the Venetians and the Maniots. The Venetians carried off the cannons and destroyed the city so it would not be used again. When the leader of the Maniots was executed by the Ottomans, his mother led the men of Skoutari who dressed up as priests on Easter Sunday and were allowed entry to the castle. When they got in they took out their hidden weapons and not many of the 700 families inhabiting the castle escaped. The castle was abandoned after that and has not been inhabited since. Dark impression; modern hand colour; mounted.
Not In Zacharakis but description of maps Nos 2080-2101. 65 by 115mm (2½ by 4½ inches).    €120
Stock No. 2724 - Greece full description

Mystras Laconia, Peloponnesus.

Mystras. Loschge, Leonhard. Mystras. "Mistras" Nürnberg/ Nuremberg. Loschge Leonhard. 1687
Extremely scarce small copper engraved view of Mystras Peloponnesus from Loschge's "Neue vermehrte Beschreibungder trflichen Halbinsel Morea mit den Angrezenten Inseln und Provinzen des Coronelli und andern Italianischen Schriften"
Modern hand colour.
Situated on Mt. Taygetos, near ancient Sparta, Mystras as the capital of the Byzantine Despotate of the Morea in the 14th and 15th centuries, experiencing a period of prosperity and cultural flowering. The site remained inhabited throughout the Ottoman period, when it was mistaken by Western travellers for ancient Sparta. In the 1830s, it was abandoned and the new town of Sparti was built.
Mystras was also the last centre of Byzantine scholarship; the Neoplatonist philosopher George Gemistos Plethon lived there until his death in 1452. He and other scholars based in Mystras influenced the Italian Renaissance, especially after he accompanied the emperor John VIII Palaiologos to Florence in 1439.

The last Byzantine emperor, Constantine XI Palaiologos, was despot at Mystras before he came to the throne. Demetrius Palaeologus the last despot of Morea, surrendered the city to the Ottoman emperor Mehmed II in 1460. As Mezistre, it was the seat of a Turkish sanjak. The Venetians occupied it from 1687 to 1715, but otherwise the Ottomans held it until 1821 and the beginning of the Greek War of Independence. Dark impression; modern hand colour; mounted.
Not In Zacharakis but description of maps Nos 2080-2101. 65 by 115mm (2½ by 4½ inches).    €160
Stock No. 2728 - Greece full description


64 results (displaying results 31 - 40) First « 1 2 3 4 5 6» Last

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